Dr Daniel Drake

Dr. Daniel Drake Article from the Butler Argus March 26, 1950. Dr. Drake Owned and Operated Idylease from 1906 until he died in 1951. Thanks to Ron & Andrea Roeser who live in Dr Drake’s former residence for providing me the original newspaper clipping.
NEWFOUNDLAND — Sunday will mark the Sixtieth Wedding Anniversary for Dr. and Mrs. Drake of Union Valley Road, Newfoundland. The couple plan to celebrate quietly at their home.

Dr. Drake, who is 86, and who has been practicing medicine for For 61 years, can be found every day at his offices at his home and at Idylease Inn, a sanitarium across the road.

Idylease opened in 1903, and Dr Drake was appointed president and head of the staff. His appointment first brought him and his wife to Newfoundland. He was associated at the time with the late Dr. Edgar A. Day of Brooklyn.

Books on medicine became his first interest, while living with his brother, Dr. James Drake of Hancock, N.Y., who encouraged him and financed his five years at the University of Vermont, where he received his degree at the age of 25.

He started his practice in Equinonk, Pa., where he was initiated into the rugged life of a country doctor, during an epidemic of pneumonia. There were calls day and night, out into the forests where woodchoppers lived with no telephone, electric lights or any modern conveniences. He always carried a shovel to dig his way out of snowdrifts, in those horse and buggy days. “I went to work at 25, and have been working ever since.” the doctor explained. “My hobby you see is practicing medicine, nothing else.”

Due to a shortage of nurses, patients at the sanatorium are limited to elderly men, who are cared for by male orderlies. This reduced the work at the sanatorium for Dr. Drake, but he is still kept busy with office and outside calls.

He is a member of the American Red Medical Association and one of the oldest members of the Passaic County Medical Association.

For 40 years he has been president of the Board of Health and for many years president of the American Red Cross local chapter.

Mrs. Drake’s hobby is flowers and rare plants. There are 163 plants in the windows of the large colonial house built for the Drakes in 1932. The doctor often assists in the caring of the plants. A picture of one of Mrs. Drake’s prize plants, the “Sansevieria Cylundria,” or “Devil’s Tongue,” was shown in a current magazine, with the history written by her.

Dr Daniel Drake. Owner & Operator of Idylease 1906-1951

The couple were married in Deposit, N.Y., at the home of the bride. The event was sandwiched in-between the doctor’s morning and evening calls in Equinonk. He had to make his morning calls, “but,” her chuckled, “I was lucky, that day, they were all in town.”

When the ceremony was over, he and his bride, the former miss Miss Belle M. Walley, hastened back to Equinonk in time for office hours and night rounds.

Their first vacation and belated honeymoon came when the doctor was 60 years old. They had their first Florida trip. After that first vacation, the Summer months were spent in a camp in Canada.

The Drakes have a daughter, Leonore, at home, and a son, Dr. L. B. Drake of Franklin. There are two grandsons, William Walley Drake, a student at Harvard University, and Charles Daniel Drake of Bryn Mawr, Pa.

Continue Reading

Newfoundland’s Oldest Home: DeMouth-Snyder House

peter snyder house newfoundland, nj

Perhaps the oldest home still standing in Newfoundland is located on Green Pond Road. The original section of the house was erected in 1732 by a member of the DeMouth (DeMont) family. There is a strong possibility that the family had originally built a log cabin before constructing the substantial stone cottage. In that era, the family would have shared the land with tribes associated with the Lenni Lenape Indians.

For years the home was referred to as the “Stone Cottage” and there must have been quite a settlement in Newfoundland prior to 1730, or a structure of that kind would not have been undertaken.

These lands would be inherited by the wife of Peter Snyder, who expanded the house in 1773. Several generations later, the Cole, Davenport, Brown, Eckhart and Kanouse families would emigrate to Newfoundland from England & Germany. A sister of Leonard Cole married Israel Holley and verbal history in 1902 suggested that the Indians carried away one of their children, who grew up with the local tribe.

The local 19th century historian, J.P. Crayon reasoned that Dutch settlers came to Newfoundland as early as 1715 because of the existence of records that indicated that Dutch ministers were dispatched to Newfoundland and held services throughout the region. Those same ministers would eventually organize the First Baptist Church of Newfoundland and The Presbyterian Church of Oak Ridge.

The towns of Clinton and Charlotteburg would also be included on the circuit where ministers would visit. The village of Clinton derived its name from Sir Henry Clinton (c. 1738-1795) who was a British general in the American Revolutionary War and a veteran of the French and Indian War.

The Town of Charlotteburg was named after Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz (Sophia Charlotte; 1744 – 1818) who was the wife of King George III. She was Queen of Great Britain and Ireland from her marriage from 1761 until 1818. A Revolutionary War Furnace still remains submerged under the Charlotteburg Reservoir which had been built in 1768 and was operated by Hessian soldiers. Many of these Hessians remained in the area after the war and settled at Macopin, where they established the first Catholic Church in New Jersey that would become St. Joseph’s.

Continue Reading

Welcome to Idylease

 

idylease-1902

Idylease (/ˈaɪdəl.iːz/ “idle-ease”), is a former resort hotel located in Newfoundland, New Jersey. It was erected in 1902 and is an architecturally and historically significant example of early 20th century resort architecture in Northwest, New Jersey. The only surviving example of resort facilities in the region, it recalls the popularity of the region as the vacationland for the middle class in the late nineteenth century.

Continue Reading